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Bears and Bucks

Posted by on Feb 15, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Though we never need a reminder that “we are never alone” in the forests, this fall has provided some exciting reminders. Bear tracks in the mud and shots captured by monitoring cameras help us keep good track of the resident bears. Work by our committed, “elite corps” of hunters replaces the role of preditors that are less plentiful than they were in the...

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Some Terrific Wood

Posted by on Feb 15, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Given the apparent feebleness of our memories, when it comes to see what types of boards are hidden in the stacks of wood that have spent the toasty summer drying in the solar kiln, the surprises are a little like unwrapping presents on Christmas morning. The fall’s 3,000 board foot charge of Oregon white oak was no exception. We were pleased to be reminded of about 20 boards that were remarkable for their width, grain patterns and absence of knots. These select boards are already on their way to local furniture makers by way of our friends over at Zena Forest Products. The remainder of the oak is in the process of becoming attractive flooring. Looking ahead to the wood that will be milled throughout the winter, we are excited to be cutting into a stack of cedar logs that have been cooling their heals on top of Mt. Richmond for the past 15 years. Where will that lumber end...

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First Significant Logging in Six Years

Posted by on Feb 15, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

After choosing not to do any major logging projects, due to poor market conditions, for the past six years, we’ve completed three projects this summer and fall. The largest project involved thinning of 60 tp 90 year old stands near the upper gate and on top of Mt. Richmond. Also at Mt. Richmond, we are working with the US Fish and Wildlife Service to continue efforts to save oak woodlands from being killed by fast growing firs that overtop them and steal the light. Since 1995 we have been actively saving and restoring our oak, and we are pleased to benefit from the advice and support provided by the helpful and cooperative folk at USFWS. We are also appreciative of the essential role that the Yamhill Soil and Water Conservation District is playing in creating a route for the federal funding to get to the project. The third project has been a 40 acre thinning of a 23 year old fir stand on Mt. Richmond. Working with Randy, Jarred, and Willard of Skeans and Son, the work has gone well and the stands look great. As the heavy rains set in and log prices drop due to the Chinesse appetite for wood drying up, it is a relief to have these projects...

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Forest Community School – Wild and Productive in the Forests

Posted by on Feb 15, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Building on the outstanding work that they’ve done over the past five years, level 2 students and teachers came to both the Timber Forest and the Manning Forest for study and exploration this fall. While the primary focus was on answering ongoing questions about the status and trends in creek health, they also explored a wide range of natural history topics. This was the first student led research on Kuder Creek and we and others in the Dairy Creek Watershed are excited to learn from their results. Stay tuned! Update – Dec. 1: Naturalist in the Timber Hyla Woods Charlie Graham’s 5th /6th grade class For some years now students from the Forest Grove Community School have done a variety of studies in the Timber Hyla Woods, including water quality monitoring, ‘reading the land’ for social & natural histories, elk management experiments with decoys, and science inquiries around phenology. This year we did something different, but breaking into “Naturalist” teams to explore and investigate the overall environment from the point of view of different science disciplines, all on the same day. This tied in well with this year’s focus on exploring how naturalists view the world and the impact they make. What follows here are the reports from each group of ‘Naturalist’. Hydrology- The Hydrology team took many measurements in and around Lousignaut Creek. It was a cold day and the air temperature was 2 degrees C and the water was 1 degree C. Fact: when the water is warmer than the air, it creates fog. Next we tested the Dissolved Oxygen (DO) and the pH (parts Hydrogen) of the water. The DO was excellent at 11ppm (parts per million) and the pH as pretty neutral at 6.5. Last but not least, we measured the flow rate of the stream. To do this we had to measure the average width and depth at three points over 50 feet. We then tried to time how long a plastic ball took to travel the 50 feet. That did not work because the ball kept getting stuck on branches and debris. We then did the same thing with some cool (but harmless)...

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A Week in the Woods

Posted by on Feb 15, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

We were fortunate to have the 10th grade students and their teachers from the Seattle Waldorf School spend a week living, learning, and working in the Timber Forest in early October. Building on what they learned the previous year from working on Jubilee Farm, they were immersed in all aspects of the forest. Instead of following the path taken by Waldorfers in previous years of designing and building a new trail, this group did an excellent job of clearing and maintaining the growing network of trails in the forest. Additional projects included falling trees, yarding logs to the mill, making lumber and using the freshly sawn board to build protective structures around our beloved baby cedars. With rain in the forecast, they were fortunate in dodging most of the drops, which noone objected...

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