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Confirmation, at Last

Posted by on Nov 29, 2014 in Blog |

After years of knowing that we share the forests with big cats, we finally have photo confirmation.  Gary Lerwick, one of the long time and reliable hunters in the Mt. Richmond Forest, has worked long and hard with his game cameras to “hunt” for images of who’s home in the forest.  He recently captured this photo of one of the most illusive and impressive forest residents.  Congratulations and thanks to Gary – for his efforts, and to the big kitty –  for making her/his home in this forest. Having reached this goal, we’re encouraging Gary to work on catching his first sasquatch...

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Divest – Invest, From Global to Local

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 in Blog |

With the US and China recently signing a climate change agreement, it appears that positive steps are beginning to be taken, in spite of our counterproductive congress. Who knows what makes change happen, but we have watched with interest as the efforts to persuade investors to divest from fossil fuel related investments has morphed into a “Divest – Invest” approach.  The progression has been impressive – from small colleges like Unity in Maine, to powerhouses like Stanford, and from small foundations to the likes of Rockefeller. Here in the Northwest the Russell Family Foundation recently divested from fossil fuels and reinvested some of the capital into the carbon storing work of our friends at Ecotrust Forests.  This video explains:  http://vimeo.com/106320933 Working on the belief that we should each try to help where we can, the Hyla Woods team has applied our own version of the “divest-invest” approach, by divesting of fossil fuel holdings and reinvesting the resources in the purchase of a significant and exciting addition to our Mt. Richmond Forest.  If our calculations in the past were correct that the Hyla Woods forests capture roughly 50 times the carbon that our family burns each year, that number should now be upped to about 70 times.  We’re pleased and...

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The Fir is Flying

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 in Blog |

How fortunate we are that our most common local tree, Douglas fir, provides such beautiful and terrific wood.   This past month, fir grown in the high quality stands in our Manning forest and milled and dried on Mt. Richmond has found “second lives” in some exciting, local projects. Our friends at Grand Central Bakery chose to creatively use our fir as a central part of the interior finishes at their recently opened bakery in the Woodstock neighborhood. Our neighbors and friends near the Mt. Richmond Forest, the O’Day family, chose to use our fir flooring for the rebuild of the covered front porch on their farm house. And finally, a reflooring job over the mountains in Tumalo ended up providing the home with the rich, warm feel of a fine wood floor....

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An Island in a Sea

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 in Blog |

Over the past few years we have realized that there is large scale clear cutting on the boundaries of all three of our forests.  With the economy rebounding, China having a large appetite for wood, and log prices up, our forests are increasingly becoming islands in a sea of cut over land.  With the connectivity to habitat on adjoining land gone, a range of species rely on the safe havens that our forests provide. Here is Pam looking out on the new clear cut on the northern border of our Manning forest.  We listen for the herbicide helicopters and plan to be nowhere near when they begin spraying. Speaking of herbicide spraying, these recent articles may be of interest: http://www.hcn.org/issues/46.19/timberland-herbicide-spraying-sickens-a-community   http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2014/10/ oregon_agencies_blew_off_compl.html#incart_river http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2014/10/ in_oregon_helicopters_spray_we.html#incart_story_package On the larger, landscape scale, here is an example of the large scale cutting NW of our Timber forest.  With many adjoining landowners cutting in close timing to one another, we end up with thousands of acres with little older than 10 years old....

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