Posted by on Jan 29, 2015 in Blog |

If this brings to mind images of Pam, the mighty mite, with braid flying, pummeling some hickory shirted, red suspendered, shagged panted, tobacco chewing, tin hat wearing brute in a mud pit on a log landing – you might want to think again.

IMG_2341   Loggers – human

You see, there are two types of loggers in our woods – the familiar human ones (who we enjoy and appreciate) and the mechanical data loggers that we use to take hourly water temperature readings in the forests’ various creeks.  Pam is wise enough not to pick a fight with the two legged loggers, but come January she does roll up her sleeves to get the upper hand on wrestling the past year’s data out of the cigar shaped loggers.  There is much that we learn – and can learn from tracking the rising and falling lines of temperature data – “how are the patterns the same from year to year?”  “How are they changing and what might explain the changes?”, “What can the ‘loggers’ tell us about the impacts of our stewardship choices?”, “Do our springs run the same temperature year to year, or is there variation?”………..

logger

Logger – non human, with the logger wrestler

So, the wrestling goes on – and we thought you might like to know.

(note – If anyone ever wants to help us with analysis of our many years of data, we’d love some help.)

Upper Lousignont Creek Temp graph