Students Share Their Results and Conclusions

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For the past three years we’ve been fortunate to have the seventh graders from Catlin Gabel School focus their research attention on the health of our Timber Forest.   Here is a report on the questions their asked, the data they collected, and the conclusions that they’ve drawn.  We thank them, their teachers and the parent […]

I Caught Hell – And Deserved It

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I thought they’d be pleased to see me, but they weren’t. Hands on their hips, they gave me a steely, stern look as I puttered up on my four wheeler “iron pony”. As soon as I shut down the engine, they accusatively asked “you didn’t drive down the road did you?”.  The four of them […]

New Food for Thought

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Our forests produce many things that we find of interest and value.  This includes thoughts and ideas.  Over time, some have proven useful while others have rightly wandered off into oblivion. I, Peter, write and share the essays shared in our “Food for Thought” section, not because I feel that I have any wisdom or […]

Full Use of Good Cedar – A Family Story

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This past year, Peter, Caroline, and Lizzie put their heads together to consider what might be a good birthday gift for their father.  Recognizing the skill and enthusiasm he brings to wood working, they asked themselves “why not get him some special lumber from our buddies out at Hyla Woods?”.  The transaction was made, Paul was […]

Who Knows….

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Who knows where the wood goes? In the busy business of caring for the forests, and milling, drying, and selling the wood that they provide, it is all too easy to lose track of where the wood ends up. This week we had a welcome inquiry from our friend and customer, Charles Freeborn.  After discovering […]

Bad Case of TMP

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As vigilant forest stewards, we are continuously on the outlook for the various diseases and ailments that can compromise the health of the forests.  Whether it is laminated root rot, ambrosia beetles, blister rust, or those damned invasives, we have our eyes peeled and are poised to jump into defensive action.  You never know what […]

Cohoho – and Raindrop – Rendezvous

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Being an experimental forest, we like to – well – experiment. Two years ago when it as 8 degrees F. at the starting hour of our annual celebration welcoming the globetrotting swimming Coho back to Lousignont Creek in the Timber Forest, the experimental question was “how many of the 100 folks who RSVPed will show up […]

Troublingly Attached to ……….

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      Over the past nearly thirty years of owning and caring for our forests we’ve discovered that we have become troublingly attached to certain species of trees  – particularly Oregon white oak.  We’re fortunate to have many acres of both savannah oak and oak woodlands in the 750 acres of our Mt. Richmond […]

Generations, Generation, and Regeneration

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  The combination of memory, calendars, and cameras help us appreciate how time passes and how forests change and regenerate, if we let them. This past week, 23 year old Molly has been the “crew boss” as we continue the hard, rewarding, long, and meditative work of pruning the lower branches from a plantation of […]

First Fish

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They’re back!   Addendum – Yesterday (Dec. 6), a week after spotting the first returning coho, we discovered that the fish apparently bring important escorts with them.  While walking the creek bank, I was surprised and pleased to scare up a large, mature Bald Eagle from a creekside sand bar.  With much effort, the big bird […]